Create a Mindset for Success: Performance Tips @Patsportsdoc

0
20
success

Creating a Mindset for Success

When thinking about your likelihood of success, it is important to be aware of what your mindset or your perception of your own ability is. If you don’t believe you can improve or grow, whether it be in terms of your athletic, academic, or professional ability, then guess what – you won’t! However, if you do believe that you can stretch your current ability and reach new heights, you’ll begin to take active steps to do just that.

successThe Four Minute Mile

For example, take the sport of running. For a long period of time, it was unimaginable that any person could run a mile under four minutes, similar to today’s two-hour marathon “barrier”. But, on May 6th, 1954, Roger Bannister did the unthinkable and ran a mile in 3.59.4 seconds! After hearing that the impossible could become a reality, runners’ changed their mindset on this perceived limitation. Guess what? Within a year, more than 30 runners had broken the four-minute mark! It all began with the belief that it could be done! In September of 2014, Dennis Kimetto of Kenya, finished the Berlin marathon in two hours, two minutes and 57 seconds, and on May 6th, 2017, another Kenyan runner Eliud Kipchoge, finished a Nike organized marathon in two hours and 25 seconds!

successThe impossible is possible if you believe. So, what do you believe you are capable of?

SHARE
Previous article5 Health Habits to Live By This Summer
Next articleBusiness Skills for Better Family Relationships
Dr. Patrick Young

Dr. Patrick Young is a certified consult within the Association of Applied Sport Psychology (CC-AASP), and specializes in providing individuals with the psychological tools necessary to reach their full potential. He is an expert in sport, exercise, and performance psychology and has consulted with NCAA Division I and II athletes, junior college athletes, and amateur athletes of all ages. In addition to athletes, Dr. Young consults with students, business executives, and individuals within the performing arts. Dr. Young is also a Professor of Psychology at Wingate University, where he teaches Sport and Exercise Psychology, Performance Psychology and Health Psychology, and has authored several articles within peer-reviewed journals and regularly contributes sport and performance based articles on Shrinktank.com.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here